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State v. Carrillo

Court of Appeals of Oregon

July 6, 2017

STATE OF OREGON, Plaintiff-Respondent,
v.
DAVID CARRILLO, JR., Defendant-Appellant.

          Argued and submitted on November 19, 2015.

         Lane County Circuit Court 201303371; A156954 Cynthia D. Carlson, Judge.

          Erica Herb, Deputy Public Defender, argued the cause for appellant. With her on the brief was Peter Gartlan, Chief Defender, Office of Public Defense Services.

          Timothy A. Sylwester, Assistant Attorney General, argued the cause for respondent. On the brief were Ellen F. Rosenblum, Attorney General, Anna M. Joyce, Solicitor General, and Jeff J. Payne, Assistant Attorney General.

          Before DeVore, Presiding Judge, and Garrett, Judge, and Duncan, Judge pro tempore.[*]

         Remanded for resentencing; otherwise affirmed.

         Case Summary:

         Defendant appeals a judgment of conviction for multiple drug offenses. He asserts, and the state concedes, that the trial court plainly erred by imposing consecutive sentences that resulted in a total incarceration term that violated the "200 percent rule, " OAR 2130120020 (2) (b). Held: The trial court plainly erred by imposing consecutive sentences in violation of the 200 percent rule, and correction of the error is appropriate, given the gravity of the error and the ends of justice.

         Remanded for resentencing; otherwise affirmed.

          [286 Or.App. 643]

          DUNCAN, J. pro tempore.

         Defendant appeals the trial court's judgment convicting and sentencing him for multiple drug offenses. On appeal, defendant asserts that the court committed plain error by imposing consecutive sentences that resulted in a total incarceration term that violated the "200 percent rule, " which limits the total incarceration term for consecutive sentences for crimes arising out of the same criminal episode to 200 percent of the maximum presumptive term for the primary offense, except by departure. OAR 213-012-OO2O(2)(b); State v. Miller, 317 Or. 297, 305, 855 P.2d 1093 (1993) (holding that the 200 percent rule does not apply to convictions arising out of separate criminal episodes); see also State v. Cuevas, 358 Or. 147, 154, 361 P.3d 581 (2015) (adhering to Miller). At oral argument, the state conceded that the court erred, that the error is plain, and that it is appropriate for us to exercise our discretion to review the error. We agree with the parties and, therefore, remand for resentencing and otherwise affirm.

         Defendant was charged with, and pleaded guilty to, seven drug crimes.[1] As relevant to the issue on appeal, the trial court sentenced defendant to 65 months in prison on Count 1; 36 months in prison on Count 4, to be served consecutively to Count 1; and 36 months in prison on Count 5, to be served consecutively to Count 4. Thus, the court sentenced defendant to a total of 137 months in prison.[2]Defendant did not object to that total on the ground that it violated the 200 percent rule.

         On appeal, defendant contends that the trial court plainly erred by imposing a total of 137 months in prison. Defendant asserts, and the state agrees, that defendant's primary offense was Count 1 and that his sentencing grid block on that count was 10H, which carries a presumptive [286 Or.App. 644] sentence of 61 to 65 months of incarceration. Therefore, the total of the consecutive incarceration terms for crimes arising out of the same criminal episode as Count 1 could not exceed 130 months.

         Initially, the parties disagreed about whether, as required for defendant's plain-error argument to succeed, it is apparent on the record that Counts 1, 4, and 5 arose out of the same criminal episode. However, in a memorandum of additional authorities filed after the briefing in this case, defendant pointed out that the prosecutor had informed the trial court at sentencing that the "shift-to-I" rule, OAR 213-012-0020(2)(a), applied to defendant's sentences on Count 2 through 7. Defendant also pointed out that, like the 200 percent rule, the shift-to-I rule applies only when crimes arise out of the same criminal episode. Orchard v. Mills,247 Or.App. 355, 358, 270 P.3d 309 (2011), rev den,352 Or. 33 (2012). Thereafter, the state conceded that, on this ...


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